Quick Coffee For Today’s Coffee Drinker

Generally, we Americans value speed and convenience over most other things, and this is true of our coffee consumption as well. The history of our quick coffee obsession has yielded many new technologies. At a time, crystallized instant coffees were the way to a quick cup of brew on your way to the morning commute, and these days we are designing ever more refined technologies to ensure we get a cup of quality coffee as quickly as possible. While K-Cups are fast enough for some, I have found an even quicker way to get your fix.

K-Cups are no joke. They are quick coffee. They make a cup of coffee in seconds, essentially on demand, and honestly, that’s very quick coffee. They meet the majority of my coffee needs just fine. I can pop in an espresso roast or a French roast coffee and at the push of a button, I’ve got quick coffee. That’s pretty excellent, frankly. That’s quick coffee from the future in comparison with my dear mother’s old burbling percolator goes.

That old thing made wicked coffee, pure black mud that cooked all morning, burning the aromatics out of even the finest of beans.

Sometimes I just want to grind my own beans and enjoy some home-ground fresh coffee. I can be in the mood for a specific coffee and maybe I can’t get it in a K-Cup. I’ll want to enjoy a precise coffee blend or regional strain and maybe I’ll want that specific variety for a week or so before moving on to something else. I needed a solution to speedy coffee that didn’t revolve around technology, one that would let me enjoy any coffee I want on demand.

Cold Coffee Brewing for Quick Coffee

This quest for nearly instant coffee any time made of any variety that I want led me to experiment with cold coffee brewing. I love the stuff. It’s made me into a cold coffee addict this summer. I can’t get enough of the stuff because coffee brews smooth and full flavored when you brew coffee without heat. It leaves you with a coffee concentrate that blooms over ice but that can also be heated in a microwave for more traditional hot coffee. This stuff is quick coffee that is customizable.

My recipe is four to one. I use four parts water to one part coffee, so one cup of ground coffee for four cups of water. My practice is to use two old one-quart glass juice bottles. I put three-quarters of a cup of ground coffee into them and top them off. After twenty-four hours in the refrigerator I strain them with my Krupps reusable coffee filter, clean the bottles and dump the concentrates back in the bottle. I set myself up for a few days this way. If you’d like a more fancy preparation, try a French press and just do what I do with bottles with the French press.

It’s quick coffee of the kind I choose. I keep a couple of bottles on hand all the time and whenever I want coffee, I just pour some. Give it a try and let us know how it goes.

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